Insights from “The silent treatment” ~ book review

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Let’s treat ourself with some amazing and deep deep silence! Time is now! Instead of any other common overrated treatment aka a dessert?,  a good book?, a holiday? Because any best treatment would be pretty miserable compared to real silence sourced straight from within. Here is a book i m treating myself with just today  surrounded by the sounds of various birds and cicadas, sipping a fruity smoothy and… longing for insights. Those kind of insights which a book like this just deliver! And without considering that i m writing this post exactly from one of the most un-silent places on earth that is actually host to the largest crowd with the noisiest lifestyle.

Here now with Five great extracts from the book

1. In bright light our pupils contract to protect our eyes, in loud environments our ears slowly produce wax to protect our sensitive drums from damage. So why are we surprised when our mind does the same thing when faced with information overload on many levels?

2. We can keep things simple or delve into our personality and behavior in ways that will astonish and delight. We can literally improve ourselves through the power of introspection and spiritual contemplation, and at a pace that suits our personal temperament.

3. But overall this new sense of self-improvement helps us realize that we still have the ability to enjoy life, with all its different modes, shades, challenges and peculiarities.

4. We dont waste our thinking, fritter it away, but instead we cherish it and listen to the still voice that can guide us to where we need to be.

5. The more we relax the easier it gets.

10 sentences or quotes from scattered books on my desk

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  1. Kyle was a good kid; he still cared about something. Would that be enough to save him?
  2. When they had been riding for several days the kings decided that they wanted to see what the child had given them. They opened the little casket and found a stone inside.
  3. Armed with Sword, Spear, Club, Disc, Conch, Bow, Arrows, Slings and Iron Mace, You are terrible and at the same time, You are pleasing, Yea more pleasing than all the pleasing things and exceedingly beautiful.
  4. [Love] It’s a parabolic movement.
  5. Loss upon loss until At last comes rest.
  6. What would happen if we blended the market norm with the social norm?
  7. The filling has to be stir-fried until done before baking. It gives the pie a unique fragrance after baking.
  8. I sometimes feel more like a fan rather than actually in the band. I can’t live up to it. But the reason why I would like to is the idea of grace.
  9. Better describe the nature. Forget about human beings.
  10. For most species, sleep is a vulnerable state, but dolphins rest on the move while shutting down only half of their brain.

The fantasy world of the media

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 Every election cycle we are treated to candidates who promise us “change,” and 2008 has been no different. But in the American political lexicon, “change” always means more of the same: more government, more looting of Americans, more inflation, more police-state measures, more unnecessary war, and more centralization of power.

Real change would mean something like the opposite of those things. It might even involve following our Constitution. And that’s the one option Americans are never permitted to hear.

Today we are living in a fantasy world. Our entitlement programs are insolvent: in a couple of decades they will face a shortfall amounting to tens of trillions of dollars. Meanwhile, the housing bubble is bursting and our dollar is collapsing. We are borrowing billions from China every day in order to prop up a bloated overseas presence that weakens our national defense and stirs up hostility against us. And all our political class can come up with is more of the same.

One columnist puts it like this: we are borrowing from Europe in order to defend Europe, we are borrowing from Japan in order to keep cheap oil flowing to Japan, and we are borrowing from Arab regimes in order to install democracy in Iraq. Is it really “isolationism” to find something wrong with this picture?

With national bankruptcy looming, politicians from both parties continue to make multi-trillion dollar promises of “free” goods from the government, and hardly a soul wonders if we can still afford to have troops in – this is not a misprint – 130 countries around the world. All of this is going to come to an end sooner or later, because financial reality is going to make itself felt in very uncomfortable ways. But instead of thinking about what this means for how we conduct our foreign and domestic affairs, our chattering classes seem incapable of speaking in anything but the emptiest platitudes, when they can be bothered to address serious issues at all. Fundamental questions like this, and countless others besides, are off the table in our mainstream media, which focuses our attention on trivialities and phony debates as we march toward oblivion.

This is the deadening consensus that crosses party lines, that dominates our major media, and that is strangling the liberty and prosperity that were once the birthright of Americans. Dissenters who tell their fellow citizens what is really going on are subject to smear campaigns that, like clockwork, are aimed at the political heretic. Truth is treason in the empire of lies.

There is an alternative to national bankruptcy, a bigger police state, trillion-dollar wars, and a government that draws ever more parasitically on the productive energies of the American people. It’s called freedom. But as we’ve learned through hard experience, we are not going to hear a word in its favor if our political and media establishments have anything to say about it.

If we want to live in a free society, we need to break free from these artificial limitations on free debate and start asking serious questions once again. I am happy that my campaign for the presidency has finally raised some of them. But this is a long-term project that will persist far into the future. These ideas cannot be allowed to die, buried beneath the mind-numbing chorus of empty slogans and inanities that constitute official political discourse in America.

That is why I wrote this book.